PHYSIOTHERAPY FOR BACK PAIN


 ” Ellie was amazing.She helped me with my lower back pain that I had been suffering with for some time.She quickly and professionally found what was causing the issue and gave me a detailed exercise and stretch plan.After following this stretch plan and seeing her for some follow-up appointments my lower back pain is much better.
Being located in Didsbury, and not far from tram and bus stops ,her practice is easy to get to from the city centre.
On top of all of the professional things that make Ellie a great Physiotherapist ,she is genuinely lovely person that I felt comfortable and relaxed with.

Chelsea Bennette,

Manchester

Lower back pain is very common – around 6 in 10 people will get it at some point during their life. In most cases, back pain gets better within a few weeks with some simple self-help measures. You may not need to have treatment. But sometimes, your pain may last longer and affect your daily life and work. You may feel low or emotional, which can make your pain feel worse.

Treatments for back pain can involve both physical and mental techniques. 

How do emotions affect back pain?

How you feel and respond to pain is a really complex process. There’s the physiological process – what’s happened in your body to cause the pain. And there’s the psychological process – how your brain reacts to the pain. Your pain may be very real. But your perception of it (how bad it feels) and its impact on you are strongly influenced by your feelings, attitudes and beliefs.

There is plenty of research on certain things which can slow your recovery. Here are some examples.

  • Believing that pain and activity are harmful. These may be your own beliefs, but they can be reinforced by people who may be trying to protect you.
  • Negative actions can reinforce the belief that you’re unwell – for example, staying in bed for a long time.
  • Having a low or negative mood, depressionanxiety or stress.
  • Having low expectations of how well treatment will work.

Relying too much on treatments that don’t help you to slowly increase your physical activity levels and emotional resilience.

 

Back pain causes 

 
Back pain is a common condition caused by injury,structural problems, inflammatory disease, and other medical conditions.

                                                                            Back pain  Symptoms 

Neck and back pain are unpleasant sensations in one or more areas of the neck, mid and upper back, or low back. Spine pain can be brought about by any number of causes and may bring on symptoms in other areas of your body.

There are many ways to describe back or neck pain, and the description often involves specific sensations, timing, and exacerbating or relieving factors.

Some common ones include:

  • Muscle ache
  • back pain spasm
  • Shooting pains
  • Pain radiating down your leg
  • Pins and needles sensations
  • Numbness in your leg
  • Neck or back dysfunction (i.e., can’t stand straight or twist neck)
  • Pain gets worse with activity
  • Pain gets better when lying down
  • Stiffness of your back 
  • Loss of bowel or bladder control

Recent or sudden onset of pain is defined as acute, while pain lasting longer than three to six months is known as either chronic or persistent pain. Acute and chronic pain are generally treated differently from one another.

Back pain can occur in the following areas:

Neck pain 

The neck is made up of 7 cervical vertebrae. It is defined as the part of the spine extending from just below the base of your skull (which is approximately at the level of the bottom of your earlobe) down to the top of the first thoracic vertebrae.

Upper and middle back pain 

The mid and upper back extends from just below the seventh cervical vertebra down to the bottom of the 12th thoracic vertebra, which lines up approximately with the tenth rib (the third from the bottom).

Lower back pain 

The low back is the area corresponding to the lumbar spine, which starts below the 12th thoracic vertebra and extends down to the top of the sacrum, which is almost mid-way down between the two halves of the pelvis.

Sacroiliac and coccyx pain mainly takes the form of sacroiliac joint dysfunction. The coccyx bone is your tailbone. It is the last bone of the spine; it attaches down at the bottom of the sacrum.

 

 

How do emotions affect back pain?

How you feel and respond to pain is a really complex process. There’s the physiological process – what’s happened in your body to cause the pain. And there’s the psychological process – how your brain reacts to the pain. Your pain may be very real. But your perception of it (how bad it feels) and its impact on you are strongly influenced by your feelings, attitudes and beliefs.

There is plenty of research on certain things which can slow your recovery. Here are some examples.

  • Believing that pain and activity are harmful. These may be your own beliefs, but they can be reinforced by people who may be trying to protect you.
  • Negative actions can reinforce the belief that you’re unwell – for example, staying in bed for a long time.
  • Having a low or negative mood, depressionanxiety or stress.
  • Having low expectations of how well treatment will work.

Relying too much on treatments that don’t help you to slowly increase your physical activity levels and emotional resilience.

Are you in pain and not able to move properly?
Are you unsure what is causing the pain and what treatment you need?

How is back pain usually treated by our Physiotherapist in Didsbury, Manchester?

                 Back Pain treatment

Following assessment and examination to determine the cause of your pain, our Physiotherapist -Ellie will devise a treatment plan which will be discussed with you.
 Physiotherapy treatment at Ellie Physiotherapy &Wellness ,Didsbury may include:
 Manual therapy (mobilisation,  spinal manipulation
Soft tissue techniques(for example back pain massage)
Home exercise program(back pain stretches and core exercises)and self- management advice. 
Back pain management and prevention :Our Physio  may offer postural ,sleeping position, lifestyle and ergonomics advise.
Evidence suggest that back pain is best managed by remaining active, undertaking appropriate exercise/rehab , and administering appropriate pain relief. 
If the problem is severe ,our Physiotherapist may refer you for an MRI scan to identify the cause of your problem and will be able to advice you whether a referral to a Specialist is required.
 
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Back pain Clinic Didsbury

Address: 

137 Barlow Moor Road,M20 2PW

Didsbury Business Centre

Please be aware that we are on the 2-nd floor and there isn’t a lift.

Parking:
We do have an allocated parking space, which is the 3rd space on the left side of the car park. If this carpark space is available ,you are welcome to park your car there, if not please park on Mersey road ,outside Albert’s restaurant or there is parking on the nearby residential streets.

Public transport:

Nearest tram stop: West Didsbury and East Didsbury (10 minute walk)

Nearest train station: East Didsbury (30 minute walk)

There are bus stops within a few minutes including 43 44 111

Buses are regular from both Manchester City Centre and the nearby student areas including Oxford Road, Fallowfield, Rusholme and Withington

What Our Patients Say About Us

Ellie is a kind and caring professional who I would gladly recommend to anyone looking for a Physiotherapist. Not only does she take time to get to know you and the reason you are visiting but she makes you feel at ease and most importantly she gets you your desired results. Don’t live with the pain or keep putting the appointment off call Ellie and be assured you will be looked after in a safe, Covid friendly space.

Anna Hulme

Ellie Physiotherapy & Wellness is recognised by all major insurance providers such as WPA,AXA,PPP,Simply Health,Aviva and many others.

It is health that is real wealth and not pieces of gold and silver.

Opening times:

Monday: Close
Tuesday: 9:30am-6:00pm
Wednesday: 1pm-5pm
Thursday: 9:30am-2:30pm
Friday: 9:30am -6pm
Saturday: 8am-4pm

Sunday-Close